Pharmacogenetics (PGx): New Research

Pharmacogenetics (PGx) is the study of how people respond differently to drug therapy based upon their genetic makeup or genes.

New research out of Stanford Medicine has concluded: based on genes, nearly everyone is likely to have an atypical response to at least one drug, scientists found that almost everyone (99.5% of individuals) is likely to have an abnormal or “atypical” response to at least one therapeutic drug. This, at least, is the case for people in the United Kingdom, as the study’s data came from the UK Biobank, a project that collects, studies and shares data.

An “atypical” drug response encompasses a lot of things; but generally speaking, it means a certain drug might not affect one person the way it does another.

“Pharmacogenetics as a field has been around for a long time, but it hasn’t really been adopted into clinical use,” McInnes told me. “It’s (PGX) been growing in the last few years as more people realize the impact that it could have on personalized health. For a long time, it’s been this overlooked aspect of genetics that I think is actually one of the most clinically actionable advances that has come out of human genetics.”

What’s more, he said, the wide variability in the human drug response applies to common therapeutics most everyone has encountered or is familiar with — ibuprofen, codeine, statins and beta blockers among others.

Understanding your genetic responses to medications can directly impact your personal and family’s healthcare plan.

Vita Medical Solutions is proud to partner with laboratories to facilitate access to advanced PGx genetic testing.

Learn more about personal and family Pharmacogenetics (PGx) markers with a simple mouth swab. With qualifying insurance, this test can cost you nothing out of pocket. Click here to schedule a call with one of Vita Medical’s Patient Service Consultants.

Call us 1.800.590.9292 (toll free) or email at [email protected].

Test. Know. Educate. Advocate.

Read the full article here: https://scopeblog.stanford.edu/2021/01/04/based-on-genes-nearly-everyone-is-likely-to-have-an-atypical-response-to-at-least-one-drug/